Improve your Business Continuity Strategies tip 10 – Implementation

These ten tips will hone your skills at devising business continuity strategies for your organization.

Tip# 10 Determine who will manage the implementation

A separate project manager may be needed for each of the large initiatives.  The business continuity professional may or may not be involved in the implementation. Where the business units are leading, regular progress reports need to be made to the business continuity team. The business continuity professional is than free to move on to the next stage in the BCM process.

A review to ensure that the appropriate continuity options have been selected for each activity should be carried out at least every 12 months. However, re-examine the BCM Strategy when a BIA revision identifies significant changes in business priorities or processes including:

  • key technology, telecommunications, accommodation, staffing, service suppliers
  • new products or services
  • regulatory or legislative requirements
  • or after an acquisition or merger.

Choose the business continuity strategy that is right for your organization at this time. As BCM continues, exercising may show that new strategies are needed to bring your organization resiliency in line with the BIA expectations. Remember that you will never develop the perfect strategy on the first try.  Following these tips should help you to improve your techniques for devising business continuity strategies for your organization.

(For more information on DRI’s professional practices please read Professional Practice One – Program Initiation and Management DRII Professional Practices  June 1, 2012 Version 1)

‘When planning for war, I have always found plans to be useless, but planning to be invaluable.’ General Eisenhower

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Improve your Business Continuity Strategies tip 9 – Contract Wording

These ten tips will hone your skills at devising business continuity strategies for your organization.

Tip# 9 Ensure contracts are tightly worded

Ensure contracts have clearly defined technical specifications and service requirements and are supplemented by a service level agreement. Understand your vendor’s business continuity plans and risk of being impacted by the same event.

Return tomorrow for our final tip on Business Continuity Strategies.

(For more information on DRI’s professional practices please read Professional Practice One – Program Initiation and Management DRII Professional Practices  June 1, 2012 Version 1)

‘When planning for war, I have always found plans to be useless, but planning to be invaluable.’ General Eisenhower

Improve your Business Continuity Strategies tip 8 – Funding Approval

‘When planning for war, I have always found plans to be useless, but planning to be invaluable.’ General Eisenhower

Your program is now moving along smoothly. The risk evaluation and the business impact analysis (BIA) have produced valuable information and senior management has signed off on your recovery time and return point objectives.  Now you must establish how your organization will meet these objectives. These ten tips will hone your skills at devising business continuity strategies for your organization.

Tip# 8 Seek approvals for funding

Senior management should not see any surprises at this stage. If your research was sound, quotes should come in within your estimates.

Return tomorrow for our next tip on Business Continuity Strategies.

(For more information on DRI’s professional practices please read Professional Practice One – Program Initiation and Management DRII Professional Practices  June 1, 2012 Version 1)

Improve your Business Continuity Strategies tip 7 – Know your Vendors

These ten tips will hone your skills at devising business continuity strategies for your organization.

Tip# 7 Be exhaustive in checking out vendors of business continuity services

Understand any risks associated with your vendors.  Begin your research by reviewing the press releases usually readily available on their websites. Explore the financial stability, management team, focus, and technology claims of prospective vendors.

Check references and try to determine whether they have experience providing these services during an actual emergency.

Avoid the gimmicks! Select a service provider you can trust by eliminating those who use questionable sales tactics.

Return tomorrow for our next tip on Business Continuity Strategies.

(For more information on DRI’s professional practices please read Professional Practice One – Program Initiation and Management DRII Professional Practices  June 1, 2012 Version 1)

‘When planning for war, I have always found plans to be useless, but planning to be invaluable.’ General Eisenhower

Improve your Business Continuity Strategies tip 6 – RFP’s

‘When planning for war, I have always found plans to be useless, but planning to be invaluable.’ General Eisenhower

Your program is now moving along smoothly. The risk evaluation and the business impact analysis (BIA) have produced valuable information and senior management has signed off on your recovery time and return point objectives.  Now you must establish how your organization will meet these objectives. These ten tips will hone your skills at devising business continuity strategies for your organization.

Tip# 6  Develop a Request for Proposal (RFP) if warranted

Preparing an RFP for large procurements is often required in organizations.  When preparing your business continuity strategies, it is essential.  Clearly specify your objectives.  Develop an RFP which includes:

  • Redundancy capabilities
  • Alternate staff
  • Workarounds
  • Surge capacities (ie: cross training of critical resources, stockpiling of critical supplies)
  • Minimum hardware requirements
  • Networking requirements (from alternate locations to home site)
  • Plan exercise options

Your request must include a confidentiality clause, a priority clause and a guarantee of delivery clause.

Return tomorrow for our next tip on Business Continuity Strategies.

(For more information on DRI’s professional practices please read Professional Practice One – Program Initiation and Management DRII Professional Practices  June 1, 2012 Version 1)

Improve your Business Continuity Strategies tip 2 – Examine alternate strategies

‘When planning for war, I have always found plans to be useless, but planning to be invaluable.’ General Eisenhower

Your program is now moving along smoothly. The risk evaluation and the business impact analysis (BIA) have produced valuable information and senior management has signed off on your recovery time and return point objectives.  Now you must establish how your organization will meet these objectives. These ten tips will hone your skills at devising business continuity strategies for your organization.

Tip # 2 Examine alternate strategies that could meet the BIA requirements

Prepare to make recommendations by reviewing the various types of recovery alternatives. Begin by examining the following traditional recovery methods:

  • Alternative site or business facility
  • Cold, Warm or Hot Sites
  • Drop Ship/Quick ship agreements
  • Manual Procedures
  • Mitigation
  • Mobile Trailer
  • Reciprocal agreements
  • Work from Home

This list is not exhaustive and your search should not be limited by it. Review internal assets for use in the recovery.  Search out external business resources using tactics such as Requests for Information (RFI), queries and professional organization reviews.  Validate your understanding with other business continuity professionals.

Discuss business continuity strategies with vendors that provide critical goods and services to your business. How do they plan to service you? Can you leverage their continuity strategies?

Return tomorrow for our next tip on Business Continuity Strategies.

(For more information on DRI’s professional practices please read Professional Practice One – Program Initiation and Management DRII Professional Practices  June 1, 2012 Version 1)

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